Inclusive Business insights

Picture: Isabel Corthier

Inclusive Business insights

When we talk about inclusive business, we mean serious business.

It’s all about doing business with a long-term outlook, fulfilling the needs of farmers and buyers alike. With this kind of forward-looking strategy, they can plan ahead more carefully, resulting in stronger businesses.

What does Inclusive Business mean to Rikolto? Check what our colleagues around the globe have to say in this video!

Following the LINK methodology, inclusive business relationships show in:

  1. cooperation between the all actors in the chain with a common goal;
  2. new relations between all chain actors, leading to a stable market and constant supply;
  3. a fair and transparent policy (open communication, fair prices, risk sharing)
  4. equal access to credit, technical support in the field, market information, etc.
  5. inclusive innovation (not ‘for’, but ‘with’ farmers);
  6. and measurable results (indicators and concrete tailored monitoring programmes or follow-up plans).

In the coming months, we will talk about each of the six principles, and give some examples about the principles are reflected in the governance of specific business cases brokered by Rikolto. You find the articles below.

Fair and transparent governance in the chain

Fair and transparent governance in the chain

Is there open communication with clear commitments between parties in the chain, either formally or informally? Does the way companies and farmers’ groups do business contribute to less price volatility and more equitable sharing of risks and profits?

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Case study: inclusive business relations between farmer organisations and Subway in Nicaragua

Case study: inclusive business relations between farmer organisations and Subway in Nicaragua

In 2016, four vegetable farmers’ cooperatives in Jinotega, Nicaragua, started providing safe, high-quality vegetables to national Subway outlets. Evaluating the business case, we have examined all the learned lessons of the last 3 years.

Read the article and download the case study
Equitable access to services

Equitable access to services

Do producers have access to training to learn more about new agricultural and post-harvest practices? Do they have timely access to market information? And to financial services? Are these services provided by the buyer or by another actor?

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Innovation is an inclusive action

Innovation is an inclusive action

Are innovation processes carried out collaboratively? Who participates and why? If innovation is present, who gains from the results? Are there profit-sharing mechanisms in place? Are small-scale producers encouraged to participate in inclusive innovation?

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Measuring equals learning

Measuring equals learning

The value chain projects Rikolto and Colruyt group have engaged in, revolved around more than just the business proceeds. The impact is also found at the level of the organisations involved. What new knowledge is generated? And does that knowledge also change the day-to-day practice of those organisations, bringing real change in the food system within reach? These are the questions we are looking at here.

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Collaborating across value chains: goodwill is not enough

Collaborating across value chains: goodwill is not enough

Collaboration between organisations with different (business) cultures is a challenge by itself. In international supply chains, the frame of reference of, let’s say, farmers in Congo is also very different from that of employees of a retailer. Not to mention the at times conflicting interests and practical problems arising from the distance between continents.

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